My website updated

I’ve finally had the chance to revisit my own website and update it.

I’ve used some very subtle CSS3 animations on the icons and buttons to highlight the calls-to-action in a way that it is obvious it will do something without it being too ‘in your face’.

I do like whitespace on websites so I’ve further improved each section of a page so the user flow is more seamless. The site is just as mobile responsive as it was before but the white space now makes it clearer and easier to view.

The top menu remains on the page as you navigate through the pages. It takes up little space and it again is just a simple thing that makes using the website that little bit easier.

Each page should be easier on the eye and easier to navigate. I’ve tried to keep my main calls-to-action in the same place on each page so again, each page should be familiar as you go from page to page.

Visit: SimonDay.Com

 

The responsive design mystery

responsive

 

During the week this week I updated TorbayFishing.Com to be more responsive.  The pages already scaled for mobiles and tablets but I wanted the whole page to scale seamlessly for desktop browsers, no matter the screen-size.

I switched the CSS rules for the structure to percentages, tested it across all browsers and uploaded it once I was happy it was working across the board.

Google analytics shows the hits are the same but the revenue from Adsense dropped by a whopping 82%. The ads are responsive so that wasn’t the issue. More people could see all the content and yet the revenue plummeted. I’ve had to switch back to the old version today and I’ll be setting up a A/B test on webmaster tools next week to see if I can track down the issue.

Sometimes doing the right thing can have huge consequences.